22
Sep

No Colour Trends Here!

Architectural colour is more than decoration, it is to be used with a sense and purpose.

Knowing the psychological and physiological effects on humans in public environments is paramount. Colour should be chosen by first understanding a space’s desired psychological outcome and then the process of choosing colours begins. This process is not just opening up a paint fan deck and deciding what might look good or seeing if a paint company’s colour or colour palettes of the year is appropriate. Here’s a 10 step process that should be taken when considering colour choices for public spaces.

Do you know the psychological outcome you want the colour of your space to create???

  1. A designer needs to interview, survey, gather information with questionnaires from all the people that will be using the space. The end user, the client, the workers, everyone involved in the space needs to involved.
  2. Gather plans and photos if available or applicable.
  3. If the space is existing, catalog and document given colors, materials, finishes in hard surfaces- flooring, tiles, laminates, equipment, etc
  4. Graph and analyze the data.
  5. Add in LRV, function and purpose of the space, history, style, period, details, accents.
  6. Location, setting, natural surroundings is it applicable to the interior or exterior?
  7. Factor in time of day, lighting source- natural, artificial, if so what is the specifics of the lighting temperatures?
  8. Demographics? Who will be in the space? Male, female, ethnicity, cultures, age etc…?
  9. Research the appropriate colour choices based on what the desired psychological/physiological outcome is to be from all the information gathered.
  10. Start creating the palettes and now ask, is there colour harmony?

A SPACE SERVES HUMANS AND THE COLOUR OF THAT SPACE MUST SUPPORT IT and finally…

designers should never put personal tastes or opinions into choosing colours. Following the steps, a designer can create a colour scheme using colour that will support a positive and the desired outcome!

Sheri Peterson, IACC, Vice President- IACC-NA

Accredited Colour Consultant/Interior Designer

www.sheripinteriordesign.com

[email protected]